LAW AND POLICY SEXUAL ABUSE

  • Definitions, Scope, and Effects of Child Sexual Abuse(Children’s Bureau)
  • Laws Concerning Child Pornography(National Center for Missing and Exploited Children)
  • Laws Concerning Prostituted Children(National Center for Missing and Exploited Children)
  • Laws Concerning the Sexual Exploitation of Children(National Center for Missing and Exploited Children)
  • Mandatory Reporters of Child Abuse and Neglect(Children’s Bureau)
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    Provided by
    FIGHT CHILD SEXUAL ABUSE AND PEDOPHILIA

    Yudhasmara Foundation

    Address : JL TAMAN BENDUNGAN ASAHAN 5 JAKARTA PUSAT, JAKARTA INDONESIA 10210

    Phone : 62(021) 70081995 – 5703646

    email : judarwanto@gmail.com, 

    https://pedophiliasexabuse.wordpress.com/

     

    Foundation and Editor in Chief

    Dr Widodo Judarwanto

     

    Copyright © 2009, Fight Child Sexual Abuse and Pedophilia  Network  Information Education Network. All rights reserved.

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    A Law-Abiding Pedophile?

     

     source : http://whitewatch.wordpress.com/

    THIS MAN IS A HERO. THOSE LITTLE GIRLS HAVE IT COMING. AND HOW ELSE DO WE FIND OUT WHERE THEY ARE!!” says one of his supporters. What kind of society allow guys like this to be on the loose? A white one.

    Is there such a thing as a lawful pedophile? Parents and children’s advocates in the Los Angeles area have grown worried about Jack McClellan, a self-described pedophile who in recent months has maintained an on-again, off-again Web page where he charts his trips to family-friendly venues like parks, county fairs and bowling alleys to meet what he calls LGs—little girls. McClellan tells reporters that he gets a “high” from being around girls between 3 to 11 years old, but insists he does not molest them. (Pedophilia covers a continuum from legal fantasy to illegal molestation and rape.) So far, law-enforcement officials agree with him. L.A.-area cops say McClellan is not under investigation. “We’ve monitored his Web site, and at the moment we’re determined that it does not cross into that area where it’s criminal in nature,” says Capt. Joe Gutierrez, commander of the Los Angeles Sheriff’s Special Victims Bureau, which handles sex crimes and child-exploitation cases.

    McClellan is atypical; he seems to enjoy the spotlight, whereas most practicing pedophiles stay in the shadows.  The 45-year-old—who lives in local motels, and, he told reporters, has had bouts of depression and supports himself with disability checks—came to local prominence in Washington state in the spring. He’d been running a similar site, called Seattle-Tacoma-Everett Girl Love, freely discussing the merits of meeting young girls at Easter-egg hunts, “bouncy houses” and church socials and offering how-to advice for other pedophiles. (“Most libraries have frequent programs and events for children, and sometimes you can get quite close to LGs there,” ran one post last spring.) But a public outcry led the service provider to shut his Web site and he moved to the L.A. area, where he soon went public with a similar site. He talks to reporters and even allowed the Santa Monica Police Department to shoot a mug shot of him—which he thought might help eliminate him as a suspect in future cases—though he got angry when police used it in a “Public Information Bulletin” warning residents about a “Notorious Pedophile Advocate.”

     Gutierrez won’t say what steps his department is taking to keep an eye on McClellan, whose latest Web site is currently down (it’s unclear whether McClellan took it down voluntarily).  Surveillance, undercover operations, information sharing and joint operations with other police agencies are options—even before police launch a formal investigation. “We will be proactive,” he says. “We don’t necessarily wait for a crime to occur.”

     Cops face a tough dilemma. If they do too little, they risk letting something horrible happen to a child—and enraging a community that will be hard-pressed to understand why someone on law-enforcement’s radar could get away with a crime. If the police act too quickly, they might violate the civil liberties of a law-abiding citizen, no matter how repugnant to community standards his predilections might be.

     

     

    Pedophiles easily find cover in parts of Asia: Lax law enforcement, child sex trade make it a prime location

    BANGKOK, Thailand – One pedophile had plastic surgery and jumped bail to elude authorities. Another paid thousands of dollars to the families of his victims after they agreed to ask that charges be dropped.

    Across Asia, pedophiles have long taken advantage of weak and corrupt law enforcement systems, endemic poverty and networks of like-minded criminals.

    The announcement that authorities had arrested American John Mark Karr in Thailand as a suspect in the 1996 murder of 6-year-old JonBenet Ramsey was viewed as a rare victory in the region.

    Karr was arrested Wednesday, a day after he began teaching second grade in Bangkok, District Attorney Mary Lacy told reporters in Colorado. Karr told investigators he drugged and sexually assaulted the child beauty queen before accidentally killing her, according to a senior Thai police officer, who was briefed about the interview.

    U.S. Ambassador John Miller, who heads the State Department’s people trafficking office, said part of the challenge of catching pedophiles is that many come across “as upstanding citizens” who are doctors, teachers and soldiers.

    “This is not easy work,” Miller told The Associated Press, noting the U.S. government has extradited and convicted 29 Americans for abusing children since 2003, about half of the cases occurring in Asia. “We’ve started to make progress, but we haven’t made anywhere near enough progress.”

    Hundreds of thousands of girls and boys are believed to work in the sex trade in Cambodia, Indonesia, Thailand, Vietnam, the Philippines and other countries.

    Sex from street children
    Some of their customers — mostly older men — commit their crimes with relative impunity, walking hand-in-hand with underage girls in Bangkok or with boys in a resort hotel on the Indonesian island of Bali. The riverfront in the Cambodian capital of Phnom Penh also is a favorite spot, where pedophiles buy sex from street children.

    “In my country, I never meet super-extra available boys,” Italian Alain Filippe Berutti said after he was convicted in 2002 of having sex with Cambodian youngsters.

    Others operate more covertly, finding work as teachers, music tutors or even volunteers at orphanages where they win children’s loyalty with candy and toys.

    “If they are in a country where there is a lot of poverty and appear to be developing relations with kids and doing things like organizing programs and teaching kids, people want to assume they have benevolent motives,” said Janis Wolak of the University of New Hampshire’s Crimes Against Children Research Center. “I don’t think it’s mysterious that these people don’t get found out.”

    Others depend on secretive pedophile rings found in cyberspace or through fellow pedophiles. The networks offer sexual predators tips on the best places to meet children or will help arrange sexual rendezvous in luxury condos or on private yachts.

    Activists say Asian governments are beginning to address the problem, enacting tough laws and moving to convict pedophiles in Cambodia, Thailand and Indonesia.

    The United States, Britain and Australia have laws allowing the prosecution of their citizens who sexually abuse children overseas. A 2003 U.S. law mandates a sentence of up to 30 years for anyone, at home or abroad, who has sex with a minor, defined as those under 18.

     

    Selective sexual networks
    But as the legal scrutiny intensifies, the networks are going underground and being more selective about who they allow into their inner circles, experts said. Some, for example, require pedophiles to provide evidence of their misdeeds — including videos of their sexual exploits or allowing others to watch them have sex with minors.

    “Because they have realized that there is a lot of investigation from the police and more and more forensic investigation of computers, it has become very, very sophisticated,” Carmen Madrinan, executive director of the Bangkok-based child protection group ECPAT International.

    Some avoid scrutiny by paying police and judges to drop cases. In other cases, a victim’s family may look the other way for a significant amount of cash.

    British rock star Gary Glitter, whose child molestation conviction and three-year prison sentence were upheld by an appeals court in Vietnam in June, gave $2,000 each to the families of two girls, ages 11 and 12, after they agreed to write letters to the court asking for the case to be dropped.

    The case against Glitter, whose real name is Paul Francis Gadd, wasn’t dropped but he got a lighter sentence — he could have been sent to jail for up to 12 years.

    Others like Eric Franklin Rosser, 49, a former concert pianist and admitted pedophile, used Asia to escape justice in the United States. He came to Thailand, got plastic surgery and bought fake passports from Britain, Norway and the Netherlands. He was arrested in 2001.

    “The way that most of these individuals are getting away from it, in the eyes of the public, is that they are jurisdiction hopping,” said Mark-Erik Hecht, who co-founded an anti-trafficking organization in Canada. “They are able to leave their jurisdiction and enter another jurisdiction with a clean slate.”

    Legal Implications

    From an educator’s prospective, since this is unlikely to happen at school, there is little we can do legally.   Some of the same legal battles that are affecting child pornography are also affecting the ability of law enforcement to control the safety of children.  The Illinois Attorney General’s Office was quotes recently as saying, “It is common knowledge in the business of pedophiles and child pornography to go to your public library and download it because it is there…When there is communication online, there is an IP address.  I can’t tell you how many times we trace that IP address back to public libraries.”  This was in reference to the Children’s Internet Protection Act of 2000 that would require libraries to use filtering software.  This law is currently being challenged and an injunction has been filed to prevent libraries from using filters.

    There are many undercover policemen and even citizen volunteers who work to protect children from pedophile by trying to attract them.  Since pedophiles can use the Internet anonymously, so can the police.  They must be very careful, though, as they must be able to prove the pedophile has the intent to follow through and break a law.  They must not do anything that can be called entrapment, which is a very fine line to walk.  Pedophiles break no laws in talking to children.  They must act for it to be illegal, by trying to meet with the child or sending them illegal material, such as photographs.  Pedophilia is strongly tied to child pornography, as pedophiles are the main users.  They often are caught sending child pornography to the children they are communicating with.  This kind of activity must be reported at once.  Sometimes when these photo are turned in, police are able to solve missing children cases as well.

     

    Provided by

    DR WIDODO JUDARWANTO
    FIGHT CHILD SEXUAL ABUSE AND PEDOPHILIA 

    Yudhasmara Foundation

    JL TAMAN BENDUNGAN ASAHAN 5 JAKARTA PUSAT, JAKARTA INDONESIA 10210

    PHONE : (021) 70081995 – 5703646

    email : judarwanto@gmail.com, 

    https://pedophiliasexabuse.wordpress.com/

    Copyright © 2009, Fight Child Sexual Abuse and Pedophilia  Network  Information Education Network. All rights reserved 

    Provided by

    DR WIDODO JUDARWANTO
    FIGHT CHILD SEXUAL ABUSE AND PEDOPHILIA

    Yudhasmara Foundation

    JL TAMAN BENDUNGAN ASAHAN 5 JAKARTA PUSAT, JAKARTA INDONESIA 10210

    PHONE : (021) 70081995 – 5703646

    email : judarwanto@gmail.com,

    https://pedophiliasexabuse.wordpress.com/

    Copyright © 2009, Fight Child Sexual Abuse and Pedophilia  Network  Information Education Network. All rights reserved

    Vile, Vile Pedophile. Is child molesting a sickness or a crime?

    Again, and for all the wrong reasons, we can’t take our eyes off Michael Jackson. Whether or not the allegations are substantiated, the question is in the air: Is pedophilia a disease to be treated, or a crime to be punished? Are people who seduce minors sick or evil? Our current legal and medical systems blur both views. We call for the most draconian punishments (life imprisonment, castration, permanent exile) precisely because we view these acts as morally heinous, yet also driven by uncontrollable biological urges.

    If sex with children is truly the product of freely made moral choices, then we should deal with it through the criminal justice system. But if it is a genetically over-determined impulse, an uncontrollable urge nestled in our DNA, then punishing pedophiles must be morally wrong. As science—and culture—increasingly medicalizes bad behavior, finding a neurological component to everything from alcoholism to youth violence, we run the parallel risks of either absolving everyone for everything, or punishing “criminals” who are no guiltier than cancer patients.

    What science has revealed about the moral/medical roots of pedophiles is, of course, ambiguous. What is clear is that the binary choice laid out above is an oversimplification. The medical community, which started to view pedophilia as a disease rather than a crime in the 19th century, has amassed evidence that at least some violent and antisocial behaviors have genetic links and signposts. But researchers have been unable to isolate a biological cause for pedophilia, or even to agree on a personality profile. Not to mention the terrific confusion within the medical community in defining what this “disease” really involves. Until a few years ago, for example, the DSM-IV—the Psychiatric Association’s Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders—defined pedophilia as a disease only if the sufferer’s “fantasies, sexual urges, or behaviors cause clinically significant distress or impairment in social, occupational, or other important areas of functioning.” In other words, a non-impaired, remorseless pedophile was apparently perfectly healthy.

    Advocates of the “disease” school say pedophilia is often the product of uncontrollable impulses that seem to respond to treatment (including castration, both surgical and chemical) particularly in conjunction with monitoring and behavioral therapy. This raises at least a possibility not associated with car thieves and insider traders: That small tweaks to one’s brain chemistry may neutralize the impulse to commit more crimes. And if that is the case, they contend, shouldn’t we be treating rather than punishing? Can we really call ourselves a just society if we are jailing folks for their neurochemical profile? In a thoughtful essay in Reason, Thomas Szasz urges that pedophilia is ultimately still a moral failure regardless of its biological roots: “Bibliophilia means the excessive love of books. It does not mean stealing books from libraries. Pedophilia means the excessive (sexual) love of children. It does not mean having sex with them.” The crime, he argues, is not the psychological impulse, but the willingness to give in to it. But this conclusion assumes an answer that science is still uncertain about: whether for some pedophiles, the impulse to molest has become a pathology. If that is the case, pedophiles can’t have the criminal intent necessary to want to commit a crime, and that mens rea is the cornerstone of our criminal law.

    Assume, for a moment, that we are sophisticated enough to embrace this ambiguity, to accept the likelihood that the reality is complicated, and that both chemistry and morality are at work in the creation of a sexual predator. Studies by Stanford University neuroscientist Robert Sapolsky suggest that mental illness really falls along a continuum—that criminals are not “sick” or “evil” but some intricate combination of both. What, then, is the moral and proper approach to their acts?

    In 1987, Robert Wright explored this choice/illness dichotomy as it related to alcoholism in the New Republic. Wright’s ultimate conclusion was that it is a mistake to label a behavior—even a behavior with some biological and genetic determinants—a “disease” because it ultimately means “giv[ing] up on the concept of volition altogether.” According to Wright, since alcoholism is the product of a complicated moral soup of environmental and biological factors, since biology may play a role, but not the only, or even predominant role, in these behaviors, we are better off holding people responsible for their actions than not. Otherwise, he argues, “things fall apart.”

    This “things fall apart” approach has its attractions. It suggests that in a world of increasing causal complexity, morality must remain all the more unequivocal. The question, then, is whether this pragmatic solution is also the ethical one as the stakes rise. The problem is that pedophilia, unlike alcoholism, has one real and tangible victim for every incident. If alcoholics damaged another person’s life with every drink, the parallel might hold. But if statistics from the National Institute of Mental Health are right, and the average molester of boys will have 150 victims before apprehension, then the social costs of a single incident are astronomical.

    If the repercussions of the act argue for holding the perpetrators morally responsible, regardless of their level of agency, then the seriousness of the punishment pulls in the other direction. Holding alcoholics morally responsible for their actions has predominantly insurance and employment consequences. Holding a child molester responsible for his actions means a lifetime of incarceration or of monitoring, unemployment, and shaming. Offender registries are certainly an alternative to other forms of vigilantism, but the practical effect is a whole subclass of offenders with nowhere to live or work. If science someday proves us wrong, and pedophiles are wholly victims of their own biology, we will have victimized them twice and called it justice.

    There are, it’s generally agreed, four basic rationales for punishment: revenge, rehabilitation, deterrence, and incapacitation. If we accept the mixed causation theory—that pedophilia is part disease and part crime, then almost none of these rationales are served. Lifetime recidivism rates show that “rehabilitation” alone has not been very effective for sex offenders, and we know that deterrence is unlikely when most offenders are able to “get away with” multiple acts before apprehension. Revenge makes sense only where rational choices led to the commission of the crime, which is in doubt when one’s neurochemistry may be running the show. Which leaves only incapacitation as the reason for punishing pedophiles.

    Now, don’t knock incapacitation. A lifetime of involuntary confinement was a good idea for carriers of the Black Plague, who were guilty of no moral failures at all. But this raises the practical, financial component of imposing complete moral responsibility on pedophiles. Our jails are teeming with sex offenders; and knowing what we do about recidivism rates for pedophiles (recent studies show that they are lower than previously believed in the short-term, but still hovering at 50 percent over a 25-year “career”) we must choose between lifetime involuntary confinement, or the cost of ongoing monitoring. Due to prison overcrowding, child molesters are released each day into communities that no longer care whether pedophiles are sick or evil, so long as we throw away the key.

    The appeal of the crime-punishment model is that it can tailor the punishment to the crime. A one-time molester is as sick as a serial predator under the disease theory. But the attraction of the disease model is that it assumes both that there is a cure, and that the perpetrators wish to be cured. There is a danger to assuming the latter is true. It’s been the basis for the states who adopted mandatory civil-commitment laws, following the Supreme Court’s holding in 1997’s Kansas v. Hendricks that the most dangerous child molesters can be held involuntarily, after their sentences are served, so long as they’re receiving treatment. The problem is that often the treatment they receive is not sufficient or effective. But since this is “treatment” and not “punishment” neither the public nor the Constitution is offended, says the court. The danger of the “treatment” model is the danger posed to a society that has sedated and medicated an entire population into a law-abiding stupor. But the crime/punishment model is similarly hopeless. The promise of an ever-growing number of pedophiles either languishing in jails we cannot afford, or using jails for sleepovers between crimes is, quite possibly, a worse nightmare than the “treatment” option. Perhaps the best solution to a problem with hybrid causation is a hybrid solution: Studies generally show that treatment is better than no treatment, and it’s hardly coddling criminals to institute a program of close supervision, drug therapy, and counseling. If science is proved even 10 percent right and nature has some hand in creating a pedophile, lifelong imprisonment solves only one immediate problem—warehousing dangerous citizens. But it raises a more immediate problem—we may be punishing sick people who could have been helped.

     

    Provided by

    DR WIDODO JUDARWANTO
    FIGHT CHILD SEXUAL ABUSE AND PEDOPHILIA 

    Yudhasmara Foundation

    JL TAMAN BENDUNGAN ASAHAN 5 JAKARTA PUSAT, JAKARTA INDONESIA 10210

    PHONE : (021) 70081995 – 5703646

    email : judarwanto@gmail.com, 

    https://pedophiliasexabuse.wordpress.com/

    Copyright © 2009, Fight Child Sexual Abuse and Pedophilia  Network  Information Education Network. All rights reserved 

    Provided by

    DR WIDODO JUDARWANTO
    FIGHT CHILD SEXUAL ABUSE AND PEDOPHILIA

    Yudhasmara Foundation

    JL TAMAN BENDUNGAN ASAHAN 5 JAKARTA PUSAT, JAKARTA INDONESIA 10210

    PHONE : (021) 70081995 – 5703646

    email : judarwanto@gmail.com,

    https://pedophiliasexabuse.wordpress.com/

    Copyright © 2009, Fight Child Sexual Abuse and Pedophilia  Network  Information Education Network. All rights reserved

    No tourism Law against Sex Tourism?

    source : http://www.tourism-master.nl/

    Introduction

    Having allegedly sex with underage girls from Cambodia is what has been done by a 56-year-old man from Burnaby (Canada). This was the third time is Canada that a man has been charged under the sex tourism law, which aims to protect children in foreign countries from sexual exploitation by Canadians. The law against sex tourism was introduced in Canada 10 years ago, but was recently amended to make it easier for the Canadian police to investigate by eliminating the need for police to seek consent of foreign country where the crimes allegedly occurred.  A person called Donald Michel Bakker of Penticton (Canada) was the to be the first person to be successfully prosecuted. He was sentenced to 10 years in prison in 2005 after police discovered videotapes showing him sexually assaulting Vancouver prostitutes and young girls from Cambodia. The chief of the Canada Border Service Agency at Vancouver airport said “catching sex tourists traveling abroad is a top priority, as is stopping child pornography at border entry points”. Sex tourism is defined by Canada’s Foreign Affairs Department as “Travel for the purpose of engaging in sexual conduct with children. In doing so, they take advantage of the poverty and powerlessness of foreign children, expecting to exploit weakness in law enforcement”.

    Original article by Neal Hall. Published in the Vancouver Sunday (14 March, 2007)

    Essay by Preeti Kerah
    Master in Tourism Destination Management student 2008/2009

    Child sex tourism involves people who travel from their own country to another and engage in commercial sex acts with children. I personally think that child sex tourism is a shameful assault on the dignity of children and a form of violent child abuse and violence. Because of these commercial sexual exploitation of children there is a possibility that children can have the following consequences which may include long-lasting:

    • Long-lasting physical and psychological trauma
    • Disease ( including HIV/AIDS)
    • Drug addiction
    • Unwanted pregnancy
    • And possibly death.

    The reason why tourists engage in child sex tourism in developing countries is fueled by weak law enforcement, corruption, the Internet, ease of travel, and poverty. At the moment there are at least 32 countries who have a extra strict tourism law that allow the prosecution of their citizens for child sex tourism crimes committed in other destinations. In response of child sex tourism , non-governmental organizations (NGOs), The tourism industry, and governments have begun to address the issue. The World Tourism Organization (WTO) has established as task force to combat child sex tourism. The NGO and WTO End child Prostitution, Child Pornography. Different destinations have taken steps to combat child sex tourism. For example:

    • The airline company Air France (France) has a portion of in-flight toy sales to fund Child Sex Tourism awareness programs.
    • Brazil implemented a national awareness campaign on sex tourism
    • Italy requires tour operators to provide brochures in ticket jackets to travelers regarding its law on Child Sex offenses both within the country and abroad.
    • Thailand provides victims with shelter and essential services.

    I think that at the moment the tourism law towards child sex tourism is not strict enough. There are several tasks which can be improved by the tourism industry itself like:

    • The Government should encourage the travel industry to implement Code of Conduct.
    • There can be Funds or public awareness campaigns.
    • Train law enforcement on the issue.
    • Be sure that border and airport officials report any suspected cases of child trafficking.

    Experts estimate that there are more than one million children are sold into the sex trade each year. Many are forced into prostitution by their parents or by homelessness and poverty. Many in rural areas are promised respectable jobs in different destinations and then forced into the sex trade. There are people like Kenneth Robert Klassen which are charged with 14 counts of invitation to sexual touching. The charges of child sex and/ or sex trade are from five to ten years. It is one of the worst things where you can go through during your childhood. There are families which do sell their small daughters for the money but I would rather say it hurts much more than starving yourself. There are so many laws towards every aspect; There should be a strict tourism law against child sex tourism in all the destinations so that children can be safe all over the world.

     

    Provided by

    DR WIDODO JUDARWANTO
    FIGHT CHILD SEXUAL ABUSE AND PEDOPHILIA 

    Yudhasmara Foundation

    JL TAMAN BENDUNGAN ASAHAN 5 JAKARTA PUSAT, JAKARTA INDONESIA 10210

    PHONE : (021) 70081995 – 5703646

    email : judarwanto@gmail.com, 

    https://pedophiliasexabuse.wordpress.com/

    Copyright © 2009, Fight Child Sexual Abuse and Pedophilia  Network  Information Education Network. All rights reserved.